Faces of Afro Brazil 29: Actress Stefanie Durval

Black Women Of Brazil

capa

Today, in number 29 of our ongoing series, Faces of Afro Brazil, we bring you promising actress Stefanie Durval from Serrinha, Rio de Janeiro. The actress has a career in theater, has participated in advertising campaigns and appeared in films such as Trinta – A história de Joãozinho Trintaand O Peregrino: A Melhor História de Paulo Coelho. Durval also had a part in the 2014 Malhação – Sonhos novela and is a part of the Walcyr Carrasco piece, Estrelas Tortas playing the character Ayra who is a friend of the protagonist, Marcella. The piece is directed by Rhommel Bezerra.

Commercial: Hora de Cuidar – Corrida

Below are some great photos of the actress and some of her career highlights. For more on Stefanie, visit here website Stefanie Durval. We hope to see great things from Stefanie in the future!

1

Photo credits

Foto: Rogério Berlorio

Make: Thaty…

View original post 276 more words

She Matches My Blackness- Being Understood

Here at foreverblackeffusion we would like to start posting people’s experiences of black love, this is an e-mail we got from Carl in London

I am a black man that has dated women of every race and I feel everyone should be entitled to have that choice, but after dating women of every race I have decided that black women are by far the best for the black man, for example when I have been been a white woman and maybe had a problem at work concerning race or being racial profiled by the police I would come home frustrated and she would never understand, saying I had a chip on my shoulder or was over exaggerating this left me even more frustrated becuase I really wanted the woman I loved to understand what I was going through, but because she wasn’t racist, she felt that no one else was citing things like post race because of Obama (yeah she said it) and I have to admit sometimes it felt like I was headbutting a brick wall. Now put this experience next to dating a black woman, I arrived home and told her about an experience at work where the boss was racist, she stopped what she was doing, made me a cup of tea and we sat down and talked about it, and she understood and even gave me some advice. I can’t even explain how good it felt to get it off my chest to the person closest to me and how comforting it felt to be understood, it just felt like a huge weight was off my shoulder, after that I felt I could go out and face the world with the love of beautiful strong black woman by my side.

Carl 32, London

tumblr_n1k6jx9nN01ru5s3yo1_500

photo by Carol Douglas/ Carolyn Douglas

R.I.P. Soul Music Legend and Rock and Roll Hall of Famer Bobby Womack

GOOD BLACK NEWS

Bobby WomackBobby Womack, the multitalented singer-songwriter-guitarist who left an indelible mark on R&B and soul in the 1960s and ’70s, died Friday at 70, his record label XL Recordings confirmed. He had been diagnosed with colon cancer in 2012.

A gutsy singer and a superlative guitar player, Womack charted nearly 50 hits, the majority of them self-penned, during his career of more than 40 years. His No. 1 R&B entries were “Woman’s Gotta Have It” (1972) and “Lookin’ for a Love” (1974), a remake of a number he recorded with his family act the Valentinos for Sam Cooke’s SAR label.

Womack also notched a top 20 hit with “Across 110th Street,” the title number from the 1973 crime thriller starring Anthony Quinn and Yaphet Kotto; Quentin Tarantino appropriated the song for use under the opening credits of his 1997 pic “Jackie Brown,” and it was also employed in the…

View original post 470 more words

African Head Wraps

AFRICAN HEAD WRAP

GÉLÉ IS the Yoruba word for a head tie or a head wrap. It is an elaborate head tie that has great cultural and historical significance to the Yorubas of Nigeria and indeed to many other African communities.

It symbolizes status, which can include class, marriage and the harmony that exists between a husband and wife in their home, history (in Ijebu, a city in south western Nigeria, a specially dyed purple gèlè is worn by grandmothers to signify the birth of a child) and fashion.

It’s gloriously eye-catching design makes it a must have fashion item at traditional events like weddings. And it’s no surprise that it has earned the name “jewel of headties”– a fact that is alluded to in Yoruba proverbs. When tied well it is seen as a crown, something majestic.

And like a scarf, it can be also be casual or elegant.

Gèlè has been increasing in popularity over the years.

10457561_759883707368302_7271127048928890993_n

via https://www.facebook.com/pages/Afrika-Arise

The Jeremy Meeks problem cont…………

The Jeremy Meeks a convicted felon, who was arrested on five weapons charges and one gang charge in California attracted a whole host of women because of his handsome face in a poilice mug shot of a Northern California attracting more than 33,000 “likes” and drawing comments praising his high cheek bones, chiseled face and striking blue eyes.

Capitalizing on his quick rise to Internet fame, Meeks’ mom, Katherine Angier, has set up an online fundraising campaign so far they have raised just over $4,000.

Angier hopes to raise $25,000.

“He has a job and … He was on his way to work. With no gang affiliations as per two of the charges,” Angier wrote on his fundraising page. “He has old tattoos..which causes him to be stereotyped. He’s my son and I’m just trying to raise funds to help him in anyway. Please help him to get a fair trial or else he’ll be railroaded.”

I have to be real here, women have hit a new low with this one. So regardless of what he’s done because he has a pretty face women want to pay for him to be out on the street. WOW.Some women even think he’s so hot they’ve photoshopped his picture on to fashion adverts.

Bqh8cdMIEAAmJn0

Mulata? Morena? Not anymore!: The power and liberation of recognizing one’s self as black

Black Women Of Brazil

Luma Luma de Oliveira

Note from BW of Brazil: Today at BW of Brazil, we bring you yet another powerful piece from the ladies over at the great blog Blogueiras Negras. It goes without saying that the Blogueiras Negras blog is a favorite here at BW of Brazil because these women fully explore the meanings and realities of being a black women in Brazilian society. We have featured a number of their pieces here because their thoughts represent voices of resistance, consciousness and the other side of Brazil that the Brazilian mainstream media and society itself like to pretend doesn’t exist. The vast majority of major websites coming out Brazil, while they will touch on the issue of racism occasionally, will never truly give consistent space to the thoughts and opinions of Brazilians of African descent who fully identify with “the struggle” and express the realities that affect this…

View original post 2,784 more words